I recently reviewed Tony Bertauski’s “Annihilation of Foreverland” and “Foreverland is Dead”.  Recently, I had the opportunity to sit down and talk with him online and this is the result of that interview.

Ten Questions: An Interview with Tony Bertauski

Does the hidden pinky finger have an R on it?
(If you don’t understand this reference, please see Tony Bertauski’s Facebook Author Page)

I’ll be there in 5 minutes.
I don’t remember if I put an R on that finger or not.
(Is that my first question?)

Nope.  Just a freebie.

What is self-publishing like?

…and don’t worry, you have as much time as you have…

Oops. Let me find my glasses. At 46, my eyes went bad.
 

Oh, please.

Self-pubbing. I’m lucky I got into writing when I did. Traditional publishing is a tough market to crack. I’ve never aspired, and still don’t, to be a full time writer. I have stories to tell. And the more I write, the more stories I find.

I love to have complete control of the story, interacting with fans and being involved with the cover. Once I put it all together, I upload to various outlets (Amazon, BN, etc) and announce through various outlets. I’ve also learned how to market it so that more people will see it. It’s a wonderful “hobby” that works like a side job. A side job I love.

By the way, an interesting blog post is making the rounds titled “Why indie writers suck“. So there’s some debate.

 

People who think Indie writers suck are generally unsuccessful Indie writers…(And that [blog] is from a pretentious snob hiding behind a nazi monocle, I mean, moniker who, has his/her/its own blog (a common form of indie writing))

 

How old were you when you wrote your first ‘thing’ and what was it?

Mmm…good question.

I didn’t write much of anything when I was young. I read a lot of sci-fi but never thought about writing. However, back in the day we passed notes in school (smart phones were still futuristic thoughts) and I had a friend that wrote concise notes that were hilarious. I remember wanting to write like that.

I attempted to write a couple books/stories when I was in my early 20s but, like most starts, they barely got started before I quit. I completed two novel-length stories when I was in my early 30s. They’ll never see the light of day. The story that got me hooked was The Discovery of Socket Greeny. I started writing it for my son when he was little, something he would read. It didn’t work. I think I rewrote that story a dozen times before it was good enough to get out.

I’ve gotten better since then.

And my son still hates to read.

 

What book has inspired you most in your writing?

Dune. I was captivated by a universe that existed in Frank Herbert’s mind that contained philosophy, politics and relationships that didn’t really exist. I wanted to create my own worlds, and I wanted to share them with others, wanted to connect with people the way I did with Herbert. Now, although I’m not a horror buff, Stephen King has been a large influence. I don’t like his endings (I’m a big ending guy, want the twist) but his style is so fluid, so visceral and comical. I rarely read his stuff without feeling like I’m in that room with that character. That, I believe, has been very inspiring.

 

What one work/series would you most like to see made into a movie? (and just to sneak another freebie in: who would you want to see play the major roles?)

Damn good question. A second to gather my thoughts.
 

…no worries…

The Discovery of Socket Greeny would be the first one because that character is so close to my heart. Socket played by…drawing a blank. I’ll come back to that before we’re done. The Foreverland series would be second with Jeff Bridges playing the Director. Claus would be third with Jeff Daniels as Nicholas Santa and Jim Carrey (so cliche but have to) as Jack.
 

Ok, throw Socket Greeny in there when you have an answer…

 

Do you write by hand, or straight to “screen”?

I write rough outlines by hand on a legal pad. It’s basically sitting on the couch with a cup of coffee and letting the story unfold. That might be half an hour to hour. Then I prop the pad up and type, sometimes not even looking at it once I’ve got it. However, even if I have to rewrite a scene I’ll go to the legal pad.

 

Aahhh. so there’s no Royal or Remington lurking in your past? (another freebie)

I learned on one and glad they’re dead.
 

I shouldn’t laugh, so did I…

 

What is the most important element of writing a story (as opposed to the craft of writing)?

I’m not a great writer. By that I mean I don’t know the rules of grammar and I don’t care. I’m interested in the story. For me, the most important element is the twist. As a reader, I become engaged when I don’t exactly know what’s coming. It doesn’t have to be a big bang surprise, but keep it from being predictable. Keep it original. And if I read that last page with a WHOA!–well, then…we have a winner.

 

When developing characters, how do you know when you have the “right name”?

I spend a lot of time on the names. There are times I’ll look up the origin of the word to match the personality. For instance, Cyn in Foreverland is Dead is short for Cindy. However, it sounds like “Sin”. That’s not an accident. So much of the time the names have hidden meanings. Socket was a fluke. I wrote that for my son so it was a fun name but then it became integral to the story. Broak was a name that had great significance in the Socket story. There have also been times where I finish the rough draft and do a find and replace because the name isn’t feeling right.

 

How much time do you spend writing on a daily basis? If you don’t write every day, what is your regular writing schedule like? (more freebies)

Socket Greeny character would be someone like Josh Harnett or Liam Hemsworth, but since they were both in Hunger Games it seems too cliche now so I’ll go with the kid in The Walking Dead, Chandler Riggs.
 

Nice.

My day job is an educator and all the ancillary things that go with it. I’m also a father and a husband. I was just chatting with an author friend about this. Writing is solitary endeavor much of the time and can isolate my wife. (My kids are older so they’re not around as much.) I’m careful about when I get focused because I always remember something from Stephen King’s autobiography. He used to write at a giant oak desk in the middle of the room. Now it’s smaller and in the corner so there’s room for life. I write mostly on weekends and in the mornings. If I’m on break between semesters, I’ll put in a lot of time. If my wife is gone for the weekend, I’ll probably put in six hours daily. I don’t think I’d enjoy it as much if I was a full time writer. It’d be a job. Right now it’s an escape.

 

What has been your most memorable encounter with a reader(s)?

There have been many but the most recent was a review of Socket Greeny from a mother that bought the books for her reluctantly reading son. Her gratitude was moving. I try to write from a place that has meaning and when it connects with a reader I am grateful.. There are elements of Zen (a practice I’ve been involved with for the last 20 some years) that underlies my stories. Even now, I’m working on a romance novel but wasn’t satisfied with the outline until the characters where sufficiently suffering and find ways to transform. That plus sex.
 

That’s funny: sufficiently suffering.. plus sex.

 

Last question: Who is your favorite cartoon superhero? (villain?)

It would have to be Frank Miller’s Batman. He was very human. However, I find great affinity for a despicable villain you can’t quite hate. For instance, Heath Ledger’s Joker was masterful. I loved him and hated him. I strive for that element in my villains. At the very end of Socket Greeny, Pike’s role as super evil, super villain is questioned…just what side is he on?

 

See, that was easy…

Painless.
And fun.
Thanks for chat.
 

Thank you for letting me pester yo
*you

I like yo better.

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